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The Lead

Man Saved By Doctor Who Walked Through Snow Storm Dies

September 12, 2014 11:28 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

The wife of an Army veteran whose life was saved by a brain surgeon who walked for miles to reach him during a snowstorm says the man has died. Andrea Robinson of Leeds, Ala., tells Al.com that her 55-year-old husband, Tony Anthony Robinson, died last Thursday of congestive heart failure.

Meridian Surgical Partners Agrees To Pay $3.32 Million In Settlement

September 11, 2014 10:33 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

Meridian Surgical Partners, LLC, a national operator of outpatient ambulatory surgery centers,...

Study: Living Liver Donors Fearful Of Donations

September 10, 2014 12:05 pm | News | Comments

Living donors are important to increasing the number of viable grafts for liver transplantation...

Joan Rivers' Surgery Went Wrong After Own Doctor Performed Irregular Biopsy

September 10, 2014 11:18 am | News | Comments

The routine medical procedure that Joan Rivers underwent last month that led to her tragic death...

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Some Patients 'Wake Up' During Surgery

September 10, 2014 11:00 am | by Smitha Mundasad, Health Reporter, BBC News | News | Comments

More than 300 people a year in the UK and Ireland report they have been conscious during surgery - despite being given general anaesthesia, reported BBC.com on Wednesday. In the largest study of its kind, scientists suggests this happens in one in every 19,000 operations. They found episodes were more likely when women were given general anaesthesia for Caesarean sections or patients were given certain drugs.

Body Donation Programs In Three States Scrutinized

September 10, 2014 10:34 am | News | Comments

Authorities are investigating programs in at least three states that collect bodies donated for scientific research, medical training and other purposes. An FBI official in Detroit confirmed that the bureau is looking at an Oregon research center, and investigators have raided facilities in Michigan and Arizona. Besides confirming the existence of an investigation, authorities have been tight-lipped about what they are examining and why.

Joan Rivers' Death Puts Spotlight on Surgery Safety

September 9, 2014 11:02 am | by Kathleen Doheny, everydayhealth.com | News | Comments

Comedienne Joan Rivers' death on Sept. 4 following complications from a routine surgical procedure has triggered speculation about what might have occurred during the outpatient procedure that apparently led to her cardiac arrest and death.

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Babies In The Womb Helped By Spina Bifida Surgery

September 8, 2014 11:38 am | by Estela Villanueva-Whitman, Des Moines Register | News | Comments

Chelsy and Jeff King knew little about spina bifida when an ultrasound showed signs of the condition midway through pregnancy. They soon learned that the defect could be repaired before their baby was even born. The routine ultrasound at 19 weeks of pregnancy detected an opening in the baby’s spine. Chelsy went online to research spina bifida and learned about a surgical procedure that could be performed in utero.

When Weight-Loss Surgery Doesn't Work

September 8, 2014 11:16 am | by Penn Medicine | Blogs | Comments

Weight-loss surgery isn’t a magic pill, or a quick fix to lose a lot of weight. Just ask anyone who has had bariatric surgery and they will tell you it is a lot of work. And, like anything that requires a lot of work, there are times when it can be too challenging. When you feel like giving up.

Variation In Hospitalizations From ER Costs Billions

September 8, 2014 10:45 am | News | Comments

It sounds like the setup for a joke: Two identical patients go to two different hospital emergency entrances, complaining of the same symptoms. But what happens next is no laughing matter, according to a new University of Michigan study published in Health Affairs. While one patient may get treated and released from the emergency department, the other gets sent upstairs to a hospital bed – at a cost of tens of thousands of dollars.

Study: One Facial Operation Can Safely Address Major Aspects Of Aging

September 8, 2014 9:43 am | News | Comments

A total facial rejuvenation that combines three procedures to address the multiple signs of an aging face and neck can be performed safely at one time, a new study shows. Total facial rejuvenation, which combines an extensive facelift to tighten skin and muscle; specialized, midface implants to restore fullness; and laser resurfacing to reduce skin's irregular texture and discoloration, can be safely performed at one time.

Cosmetic Surgery Regret Is On The Rise

September 5, 2014 11:24 am | by PRWeb | Blogs | Comments

According to New York City Facial Plastic Surgeon Sam Rizk, “At this point, about fifty percent of the procedures I perform are revision surgery. Although rhinoplasty has historically been the number one revision procedure, patients are also seeking secondary facelifts, neck lifts and blepharoplasties (eyelid surgery) in record numbers.”

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Retired Military Dog Needs Help For Livesaving Surgery

September 4, 2014 11:23 am | by CBS Denver | News | Comments

He is a retired military working dog who only has a few months left to live — unless he gets a lifesaving operation that will cost thousands of dollars, reported CBS Denver on Wednesday. Kay now lives in Brighton, Colo.,  but spent years in the military, and his owners say euthanization just isn’t an option — so they’re turning to the public for help.

Bariatric Accreditation Linked to Improved Rates of Patient Survival and Fewer Complications

September 4, 2014 10:34 am | News | Comments

Patients who underwent weight loss operations in recent years, when most bariatric surgical centers were accredited, had fewer postoperative complications and were 2.3 times less likely to die in the hospital than patients who had bariatric procedures performed before a national movement toward facility accreditation was taking place, according to new study findings.

3M Partners With Premier on Catheter Contracts

September 3, 2014 5:04 pm | News | Comments

3M Critical & Chronic Care Solutions announced last week that it has reached a group purchasing agreement with health care alliance company Premier, Inc. for multiple catheter securement and stability products.

Hospital Mix-up: Florida Woman Has Surgery For Cancer She Never Had

September 3, 2014 11:41 am | by Rene Stutzman, Orlando Sentinel | News | Comments

A Winter Park, Fla., woman filed a lawsuit Tuesday asking a judge to order Florida Hospital to surrender records documenting a lab mix-up that resulted in a false cancer diagnosis and the removal of a section of her rectum, reported the Orlando Sentinel on Wednesday.

Double Mastectomy Doesn't Boost Survival For Most

September 3, 2014 10:47 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

Removing both breasts to treat cancer affecting only one side doesn't boost survival chances for most women, compared with surgery that removes just the tumor, a large study suggests. The results raise concerns about riskier, potentially unnecessary operations that increasing numbers of women are choosing.

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SSIs May Occur Less After Minimally Invasive Surgery

September 2, 2014 12:17 pm | News | Comments

Minimally invasive surgery is associated with fewer surgical-site infections than is open surgery, according to a new observational study of tens of thousands of patients, reported Rueters Health on Tuesday. "Physicians should consider the adoption of minimally invasive approaches in order to reduce the risk of surgical site infections," said lead author Dr. Giorgio Gandaglia.

Programs Aim to Standardize Surgical Care for Children

September 2, 2014 11:05 am | News | Comments

For parents, the prospect of a child's surgery can be frightening, with little information on how to pick the best hospital or understand complex procedures. To help, surgeons have developed a new classification system for pediatric surgical centers according to the level of care they provide, similar to the one that classifies trauma centers, reported the Wall Street Journal on Monday.

Cardiac Surgery: Medication Shows Mixed Results in Reducing Complications

September 2, 2014 10:05 am | News | Comments

Administration of colchicine, a plant-based medication commonly used to treat gout, before and after cardiac surgery showed mixed results in reducing potential complications from this type of surgery, but it did increase the risk of gastrointestinal adverse effects, according to a study published by JAMA. The study is being released early online to coincide with its presentation at the European Society of Cardiology Congress.

Florida Prostate Cancer Specialist Challenges Robotic Surgical System

August 28, 2014 3:47 pm | Blogs | Comments

In an extensive article http://www.urologyweb.com/robotic-prostate-cancer-surgery-a-public-health-nightmare/, Urologist Dr. Bert Vorstman details “Robotic Prostate Cancer Surgery: A Public Health Nightmare”, the story behind prostate cancer and the industry that has been built around it.

Ebola Virus: CDC Releases Recommendations to Hospitals

August 28, 2014 1:29 pm | News | Comments

Standard, contact, and droplet precautions are recommended for management of hospitalized patients with known or suspected Ebola hemorrhagic fever (Ebola HF), also referred to as Ebola Viral Disease (EVD). Though these recommendations focus on the hospital setting, the recommendations for personal protective equipment (PPE) and environmental infection control measures are applicable to any healthcare setting.

Hospital Loses $2M in Wrongful Death Lawsuit

August 28, 2014 12:57 pm | News | Comments

According to court documents, Olga Sanchez had been admitted to the hospital after complaints of flank pain and urinating blood. During her admission, she was examined by a hematologist and her lab tests were interpreted by a clinical pathologist. Despite a laboratory diagnosis of a bleeding disorder, the doctors and the hospital never provided appropriate care to stop the internal bleeding.

Chinese Teenager to Have Surgery for Unusual Neck Condition

August 28, 2014 12:43 pm | News | Comments

The New York Daily News reported on Thursday that a Chinese teenager with an unusual neck condition will receive corrective surgery. Fu Wengui, 15, has 10 vertebrae in his neck — three more than the average person. The condition causes him pain, stress on his nerves and makes it difficult for him to walk with the super long neck, according to REX Features.

Older Parkinson's Patients No Higher Risk for DBS

August 26, 2014 11:47 am | News | Comments

Implantating deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices poses no greater risk of complications to older patients than it does to younger patients with Parkinson's disease, researchers at Duke Medicine report. The findings, published Aug. 25 in the journal JAMA Neurology, ease concerns that patients older than 75 are poorer candidates for DBS because they may be prone to bleeding, infections or other complications that can arise after surgeries.

Nasal Cell Transplant Leads to Snotty Spine

August 25, 2014 12:08 pm | News | Comments

Surgeons removed cysts layered with actual snot from a 29-year-old woman's back 8 years after transplanting nasal stem cells into her spinal injury, neurosurgeon Brian Dlouhy, MD, of the University of Iowa in Iowa City, and colleagues reported.

Botched Operations at Private UK Surgery Clinics Hurting Patients

August 21, 2014 12:00 pm | News | Comments

For over a decade, it has been government policy in England to take money from the public, national health system (NHS) and give it to private (often for-profit) clinics to perform procedures and surgeries otherwise done at public hospitals. Doctors in England have routinely spoken out against the policy. They’ve warned about poorer quality care and safety risks for patients.

Plastic Surgery: Important Questions Before Going Under the Knife

August 21, 2014 11:23 am | by Dr. Michael Gartner | News | Comments

Within the field of plastic surgery, there are a lot of negative connotations that people associate with it. However, that’s a result of the non-licensed doctors and those seeking plastic surgery that go overboard and their psychological issues are not properly addressed. When someone chooses to get plastic surgery, it’s a big decision to make because you’re changing what you see in the mirror everyday, which can be overwhelming.

Is Reverse Plastic Surgery New Trend in South Korea?

August 20, 2014 11:59 am | News | Comments

Euny Hong joins guest host Terry O'Reilly to discuss the ubiquity of plastic surgery in South Korea, where it is believed one in three women have gone under the knife in recent years. Hong, author of The Birth of Korean Cool, explains the cultural factors driving their popularity, and sheds light on the growing counter-trend that inspired the new Back to my Face reality show.

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