Advertisement
Patient & Staff Safety
Subscribe to Patient & Staff Safety

The Lead

Reintroducing Aprotinin In Cardiac Surgery May Put Patients at Risk

September 30, 2014 12:10 pm | News | Comments

Cardiac surgery patients may be at risk because of a decision by Health Canada and the European Medicines Agency to reintroduce the use of aprotinin after its withdrawal from the worldwide market in 2007, assert the authors of a previous major trial that found a substantially increased risk of death associated with the drug ...

Report: Risk of Opioids Outweigh Benefits For Pain

September 30, 2014 10:16 am | News | Comments

According to a new position statement from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the risk of...

Decision Analysis Can Help Women Make Choices About Breast Reconstruction

September 29, 2014 11:43 am | News | Comments

Decision analysis techniques can help surgeons and patients evaluate alternatives for breast...

Mississippi Named 'Best State to Practice' for Second Straight Year

September 26, 2014 10:27 am | News | Comments

For the second straight year, the Magnolia State is tops when it comes to a physician-friendly...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Brothers Behind Lap-Band Surgery Sued

September 26, 2014 10:05 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

According to the Associated Press, UnitedHealth Group Inc. has sued two brothers who ran a company that promoted Lap-Band weight-loss surgery, accusing the pair of defrauding the insurer of more than $40 million through a complex billing scheme.

Treatment Studied To Help Patients ‘Burned To The Bone’

September 25, 2014 12:26 pm | News | Comments

According to a University of Michigan report released Thursday, an anti-inflammatory treatment, studied in the labs of regenerative medicine specialists and trauma surgeons, may prevent what’s become one of the war-defining injuries for today’s troops.

Study: Pain Keeps Surgery Patients Awake, Extends Stay

September 25, 2014 10:05 am | News | Comments

Pain can make it difficult for some patients to get a good night's rest while recovering in the hospital following certain surgical procedures, often resulting in longer hospital stays, according to researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit.

Advertisement

New Research Suggests Sleep Apnea Screening Before Surgery

September 24, 2014 9:54 am | News | Comments

According to a first-of-its-kind study in the October issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists® (ASA®), patients with OSA who are diagnosed and treated for the condition prior to surgery are less likely to develop serious cardiovascular complications such as cardiac arrest or shock ...

How Safe Are Outpatient Surgical Facilities?

September 23, 2014 10:14 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

The American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities, Inc. (AAAASF) is a nonprofit organization established in 1980 to promote patient safety in the outpatient setting. Patient safety is the sole mission of the organization. "AAAASF is sympathetic to the recent unfortunate and highly publicized case involving an outpatient surgical facility," said Dr. Geoffrey Keyes, AAAASF board president.

Citing Joan Rivers, Texas' Perry Backs Clinic Law

September 22, 2014 10:54 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

Republican Texas Gov. Rick Perry on Sunday invoked comedian Joan Rivers' death at a surgical clinic while defending a law he signed that would close the majority of abortion facilities in the nation's second-most populous state. The potential 2016 presidential candidate said the law made Texas safer, even though a federal judge in August blocked a key provision that requires abortion clinics to meet hospital-level operating standards.

Neurosurgery Tackles Past, Current And Future Concepts of Sports Concussion

September 22, 2014 10:39 am | News | Comments

An estimated 1.68 to 3.8 million sports-related concussions occur in the United States each year, and there are likely a significant number that go unreported. Current Concepts in Sports Concussion is a comprehensive, 16-article supplement of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

Family Squabbles Can Derail Recovery From Cancer Surgery

September 19, 2014 11:05 am | by Alan Mozes, HealthDay Reporter | News | Comments

Cancer patients burdened by stress and family conflicts before surgery may face a higher risk for complications following their operation, a new study suggests. Investigators found that patients with a so-called quality-of-life "deficit" appeared to have a nearly three times greater risk for complications compared to those with a normal or good quality of life.

Advertisement

Pennsylvania Deaths Related To Robotic Surgery

September 19, 2014 10:45 am | by Kris B. Mamula, Pittsburgh Business Times | News | Comments

Doctors reported 722 “safety events” between 2005 and March 31 involving use of robotic surgery in a variety of procedures, the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority found. Unintended laceration, bleeding and infection were among 75 percent of the problems that were reported, according to the Harrisburg-based nonprofit that seeks to identify and correct problems in medical care.

Utah Doctor Gets Up To Life In Wife's Murder

September 19, 2014 10:10 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

A Utah doctor found guilty of killing his wife in a trial that became a national true-crime cable TV obsession will serve 17 years to life in prison, a state judge decided Friday. The long-awaited sentence comes seven years after prosecutors say Martin MacNeill knocked out his wife with drugs prescribed following cosmetic surgery and left her to die in a bathtub so he could begin a new life with his mistress.

Report: US Health System Not Properly Designed To Meet Needs Of Patients Nearing Death

September 18, 2014 11:54 am | News | Comments

The U.S. health care system is not properly designed to meet the needs of patients nearing the end of life and those of their families, and major changes to the system are necessary, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. The 21-member committee that wrote the report envisioned an approach to end-of-life care that integrates traditional medical care and social services and that is high-quality, affordable, and sustainable.

Joan Rivers' Doctor Snapped Selfie During Throat Surgery

September 17, 2014 11:28 am | by Ginger Adams Otis, New York Daily News | News | Comments

Joan Rivers’ personal doctor stopped to take a selfie in the procedure room while the famous comedienne was under anesthesia, just moments before she went into cardiac arrest, CNN reported Tuesday. Rivers, 81, was getting a routine scoping of her throat at Yorkville Endoscopy Aug. 28 when her own physician performed an unplanned biopsy on her vocal cords, a source told the Daily News.

Research Reveals Reasons Behind Ethnic Rhinoplasty Plastic Surgery Complications

September 17, 2014 10:55 am | News | Comments

Rhinoplasty surgery, also known as "nose reshaping" or "nose job" was the second most requested cosmetic surgical procedure for 2013, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.  Yet, nose reshaping is considered one of the most complex of facial plastic surgery procedures for a surgeon to perform. 

Advertisement

New Radiosurgery Technology Provides Highly Accurate Treatment, Patient Comfort

September 17, 2014 10:17 am | News | Comments

A new stereotactic radiosurgery system provides the same or a higher level of accuracy in targeting cancer tumors – but offers greater comfort to patients and the ability to treat multiple tumors at once – when compared to other radiation therapy stereotactic systems. The study shows the Edge™ Radiosurgery Suite is able to target cancer tumors within 1 mm, providing sub-millimeter accuracy with extreme precision.

Ebola Outbreak 'Out Of All Proportion' And Severity Cannot Be Predicated

September 16, 2014 11:52 am | News | Comments

A mathematical model that replicates Ebola outbreaks can no longer be used to ascertain the eventual scale of the current epidemic, finds research conducted by the University of Warwick. Dr. Thomas House, of the University's Warwick Mathematics Institute, developed a model that incorporated data from past outbreaks that successfully replicated their eventual scale.

Largest Study Of Awareness During General Anaesthesia Identifies Risk Factors

September 15, 2014 12:05 pm | News | Comments

Accidental awareness is one of the most feared complications of general anaesthesia for both patients and anaesthetists. Patients report this failure of general anaesthesia in approximately 1 in every 19,000 cases, according to a report published in Anaesthesia.

Considering Surgery? Some Healthcare Providers Offer Warranties

September 15, 2014 11:08 am | by Lisa Zamosky, Los Angeles Times | News | Comments

When Carolyn Rondou needed knee replacement surgery in 2012, she decided to have the procedure done at Hoag Orthopedic Institute in Irvine, even though there were several hospitals closer to her home in Fullerton. Rondou, a 66-year-old oncology nurse, says Hoag's reputation for quality factored heavily into her decision to have her procedure done there. But something else sweetened the pot: Her surgery came with a warranty.

Man Saved By Doctor Who Walked Through Snow Storm Dies

September 12, 2014 11:28 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

The wife of an Army veteran whose life was saved by a brain surgeon who walked for miles to reach him during a snowstorm says the man has died. Andrea Robinson of Leeds, Ala., tells Al.com that her 55-year-old husband, Tony Anthony Robinson, died last Thursday of congestive heart failure.

Meridian Surgical Partners Agrees To Pay $3.32 Million In Settlement

September 11, 2014 10:33 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

Meridian Surgical Partners, LLC, a national operator of outpatient ambulatory surgery centers, announced today that it has settled a qui tam lawsuit brought by a former employee at one of its centers. While denying any liability, Meridian agreed to pay the U.S. government $3.32 million, a small fraction of the $100 million originally demanded by the plaintiff, Thomas Reed Simmons.

Study: Living Liver Donors Fearful Of Donations

September 10, 2014 12:05 pm | News | Comments

Living donors are important to increasing the number of viable grafts for liver transplantation. A new study published in Liver Transplantation, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society, found that ambivalence is common among donor candidates. However, providing social support may help minimize the donors' concerns regarding donation.

Joan Rivers' Surgery Went Wrong After Own Doctor Performed Irregular Biopsy

September 10, 2014 11:18 am | News | Comments

The routine medical procedure that Joan Rivers underwent last month that led to her tragic death a week later went catastrophically wrong when her own personal doctor performed a surprise biopsy on her vocal cords, according to a source with knowledge of the legendary comic's death. According to the source, she had not signed off on the biopsy before undergoing surgery at Yorkville Endoscopy in Manhattan on Aug. 28.

Some Patients 'Wake Up' During Surgery

September 10, 2014 11:00 am | by Smitha Mundasad, Health Reporter, BBC News | News | Comments

More than 300 people a year in the UK and Ireland report they have been conscious during surgery - despite being given general anaesthesia, reported BBC.com on Wednesday. In the largest study of its kind, scientists suggests this happens in one in every 19,000 operations. They found episodes were more likely when women were given general anaesthesia for Caesarean sections or patients were given certain drugs.

Body Donation Programs In Three States Scrutinized

September 10, 2014 10:34 am | News | Comments

Authorities are investigating programs in at least three states that collect bodies donated for scientific research, medical training and other purposes. An FBI official in Detroit confirmed that the bureau is looking at an Oregon research center, and investigators have raided facilities in Michigan and Arizona. Besides confirming the existence of an investigation, authorities have been tight-lipped about what they are examining and why.

Joan Rivers' Death Puts Spotlight on Surgery Safety

September 9, 2014 11:02 am | by Kathleen Doheny, everydayhealth.com | News | Comments

Comedienne Joan Rivers' death on Sept. 4 following complications from a routine surgical procedure has triggered speculation about what might have occurred during the outpatient procedure that apparently led to her cardiac arrest and death.

Babies In The Womb Helped By Spina Bifida Surgery

September 8, 2014 11:38 am | by Estela Villanueva-Whitman, Des Moines Register | News | Comments

Chelsy and Jeff King knew little about spina bifida when an ultrasound showed signs of the condition midway through pregnancy. They soon learned that the defect could be repaired before their baby was even born. The routine ultrasound at 19 weeks of pregnancy detected an opening in the baby’s spine. Chelsy went online to research spina bifida and learned about a surgical procedure that could be performed in utero.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading