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The Lead

Near 700-Pound Woman Prepares for Gastric Bypass Surgery

December 19, 2014 12:06 pm | by Dana Dovey, Medical Daily | News | Comments

Amber is 24 years old and weighs nearly 700 pounds. She is one of the newest individuals to share her struggle with weight on TLC’s My 600-Pound Life. The show will follow Amber as she prepares to undergo a risky gastric bypass surgery in a desperate attempt to lose weight and save her life. ...

U.S. Laparoscopic Device Market Will Reach Over $4.3 Billion by 2023

December 19, 2014 10:56 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

Decision Resources Group finds that the laparoscopic device market in the United States will...

Oxygen Suction Can Reduce Risk of Surgical Fires in Dental Procedures

December 19, 2014 10:25 am | News | Comments

The oxygen-enriched environment of surgical procedures creates the risk of fire. As many as 600...

New Technology Advances Eye Tracking For Brain Injuries

December 18, 2014 12:03 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have developed new technology that can assess the...

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Lottenberg Talks About Successful RSS Prevention

December 18, 2014 11:10 am | by Surgical Products Staff | News | Comments

Surgical Products recently talked to Dr. Lawrence Lottenberg, MD FACS, University of Florida College of Medicine, about two systems, the RF Assure Detection System and the RF Assure Delivery System, being used across the country to reduce RSS events in the OR. With this breakthough in technology, Lottenberg said the future in RSS prevention "looks bright."...   

Promising Treatment Could Fight Cancer, Other Diseases

December 17, 2014 11:37 am | News | Comments

Promising treatments known as biologics are on the market and under development for many serious illnesses such as cancer, but some of them come with high risks, even lethal ones. ...           

Veteran Finally Gets Simple Surgery After Year-Long Wait

December 17, 2014 10:42 am | by Melissa Blasius, KUSA News | News | Comments

Thomas Amabile had cataract surgery Tuesday after a yearlong ordeal with the Denver VA Hospital, which highlights ongoing lapses in patient scheduling. ...                 

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Operating Tunes: How Music Helps Surgery

December 17, 2014 10:14 am | by Julie Beck, The Atlantic | News | Comments

The third episode of the hospital comedy Scrubs starts with a tense moment in the operating room between attending surgeon Dr. Wen and his intern Dr. Turk. ...                

Top Blood Transfusion Complication More Common Than Previously Reported

December 16, 2014 11:43 am | News | Comments

Two studies published in the January issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists® (ASA®), shed new light on the prevalence of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), the number one and two leading causes of blood transfusion-related deaths in the United States. ...

Popularity Of Outpatient Surgery Centers Leads To Questions About Safety

December 16, 2014 10:45 am | by Kaiser Health News | News | Comments

Wendy Salo was alarmed when she learned where her doctor had scheduled her gynecologic operation: at an outpatient surgery center. “My first thought was ‘Am I not important enough to go to a real hospital?’ ” recalled Salo, 48, a supermarket department manager who said she felt “very trepidatious” about having her ovaries removed outside a hospital. ...   

Shapiro Making 'Amazing Progress' After Surgery

December 15, 2014 12:01 pm | by AOL.com | News | Comments

Less than a year after 12-year-old Alexis Shapiro underwent major life-saving surgery to correct a rare condition that caused her to always feel hungry and rapidly gain weight, her mother says she's finally getting her childhood back. ...     

Two Minute Delay in Cutting Cord Leads to Better Newborn Development

December 15, 2014 10:58 am | News | Comments

A study conducted by University of Granada scientists (from the Physiology, Obstetrics and Gynaecology Departments) and from the San Cecilio Clinical Hospital (Granada) has demonstrated that delaying the cutting of the umbilical cord in newborns by two minutes leads to a better development of the baby during the first days of life. ...  

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Simple Steps Can Safeguard Ebola Transmission Through Organ Donation

December 15, 2014 10:10 am | News | Comments

While serious infections can be transmitted from donated organs, the risk of passing Ebola virus disease from an organ donor to a recipient is extremely small. In a new editorial published in the American Journal of Transplantation, experts explain how simple assessments of donors can help ensure that the organ supply is safe, while having little impact on the donor pool. ...

Survey: Prescription Drug Abuse 'Significant Problem'

December 12, 2014 12:01 pm | News | Comments

A survey of primary care physicians found the vast majority of practicing internists, family physicians and general practitioners consider prescription drug abuse to be a significant problem in their community and most physicians agreed opioids were overused to treat pain, according to a research letter published online by JAMA Internal Medicine. ...   

Stroke: Promising Results in Recent Study

December 12, 2014 11:32 am | News | Comments

Neuro-rehabilitation (physical therapy, occupational therapy, etc.) helps hemaparetic stroke patients confronted with loss of motor skills on one side of their body, to recover some of their motor functions after a cerebrovascular accident. ...        

Children Without Public Insurance Waited Longer For Tests

December 12, 2014 10:09 am | News | Comments

Children with public insurance waited longer after initial evaluation for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) to undergo polysomnography (PSG, the gold standard diagnostic test) and also waited longer after PSG to have surgery to treat the condition with adenotonsillectomy (AT) compared with children who were privately insured, according to a report published online by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery. ...

AORN Cleaning Steps Practical For Efficient OR Turnover

December 11, 2014 12:23 pm | by Michael Gil and Linda Homan, Ecolab Healthcare | News | Comments

The AORN Recommended Practices state that “Every patient deserves a clean OR,” but historically there has been no easy way to objectively quantify that the OR is clean. In addition, surgical site infections (SSIs) continue to be a significant source of clinical complication and economic consequence for hospitals. ...

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Study: Patients Given Less Blood During Transfusions Do Well

December 11, 2014 10:52 am | News | Comments

Patients with heart disease who receive transfusions during surgeries do just as well with smaller amounts of blood and face no greater risk of dying from other diseases than patients who received more blood, according to a new Rutgers study. ...     

Drug Proves Effective Against 'Superbugs'

December 10, 2014 12:14 pm | News | Comments

A treatment pioneered at the University of Pittsburgh Center for Vaccine Research (CVR) is far more effective than traditional antibiotics at inhibiting the growth of drug-resistant bacteria, including so-called "superbugs" resistant to almost all existing antibiotics, which plague hospitals and nursing homes. ...    

New Approaches Key to Reducing Surgical Site Infections

December 10, 2014 11:13 am | by Surgical Products Staff | News | Comments

Surgical Products recently talked to Charles E. Edmiston Jr., PhD., CIC, Professor of Surgery & Hospital Epidemiologist - Department of Surgery at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee about the importance of reducing surgical site infections and how the use of a surgical care bundle is aiming to improve patient care across the country. ...  

Restricting Surgical Residents' Hours Doesn't Improve Outcomes

December 10, 2014 10:17 am | News | Comments

Controversial restrictions on hospital residents' duty hours imposed in 2011 did not improve surgery patients' outcomes, reports a large new Northwestern Medicine study of U.S. hospitals, one of the first national evaluations of the results of the restrictions. ...    

Patients With Problems After Surgery Should Go Back to Same Hospital

December 9, 2014 11:11 am | by Reuters | News | Comments

When patients have complications after surgery, it’s best to go back to the hospital where the operation was done, a new study suggests. Patients who go instead to a hospital that didn’t do the original operation have a higher risk of death, the researchers found. ...     

Surgery in Space? Surgeon Sees Many Problems

December 9, 2014 10:42 am | by the Skeptical Scalpel, Physician's Weekly | Blogs | Comments

The astronauts are halfway to Mars when suddenly one of them develops abdominal pain and requires surgery. What will they do?                            

Boy With Massive Tumor Moved Out of ICU

December 9, 2014 10:06 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

An 11-year-old Mexican boy who had portions of a massive tumor removed in New Mexico is out of intensive care, a spokesman for a church helping the boy said Sunday. Kristean Alcocer of the First Baptist Church of Rio Rancho told The Associated Press that Jose Antonio Ramirez Serrano is recovering after his 11-hour surgery on Nov. 17. ...  

New Siemens Angiography Applications Enable Greater Diagnostic Confidence

December 8, 2014 11:50 am | Product Releases | Comments

At the 100th Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), Nov. 30-Dec. 5 in Chicago, Siemens Healthcare presented two new clinical applications for angiography. ...  

Hack-A-Thon Attacks Ebola With Robots, Software, Remote Controls

December 8, 2014 11:33 am | by GE Reports.com | News | Comments

Treating an infectious disease like the Ebola virus is fraught with dangers for both victims and their caretakers. Ebola’s fatality rate can reach 70 percent and an errant drop of blood, vomit or other bodily fluid can turn a nurse or a doctor into a patient. That’s why engineers and technologists started looking for ways that would allow hospital staff to limit their exposure to the virus when treating the sick. ...

Malnutrition Predictor of Long-Term Survival for Whipple Patients

December 8, 2014 11:06 am | News | Comments

Malnutrition is an important factor predicting long-term survival in older patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) (commonly called the Whipple procedure) to treat benign tumors and cysts of the pancreas as well as pancreatitis, according to  new study results published in the December issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. ...     

Boy Gets Visit From Officer Who Helped Bring Him to U.S. for Surgery

December 8, 2014 10:20 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

A 9-year-old Afghan boy born with his bladder outside his body got a special visitor at his Pennsylvania school — the Army officer who helped bring him to the United States for corrective surgery. ...         

Twenty-Four Indian Patients Blinded After Cataract Surgery

December 5, 2014 10:31 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

Authorities ordered an investigation Friday after at least 24 poor and elderly people went blind following cataract surgeries performed at a free medical camp run by a charity in northern India. ...           

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