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Couple Marries After Losing 380 Pounds Through Weight Loss Surgery

November 3, 2014 10:59 am | News | Comments

A Detroit-area couple who met in a support group for weight loss surgery patients exchanged wedding vows after losing a collective 380 pounds. Crysta Danaher, 34, of Windsor, and Bill Anderson, 44, of Allen Park, were married Saturday at Henry Ford Wyandotte Hospital, where they had bariatric surgery and later met, the Detroit Free Press (http://on.freep.com/1GdnjeH ) reported ...

Scientists Trigger Self-Destruct Switch in Lung Cancer Cells

October 31, 2014 11:51 am | News | Comments

UK scientists have found a drug combination that can trigger the self-destruct process in lung cancer cells - paving the way for new treatments, according to research that will be presented at the National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference in Liverpool next week ...

Heart Valve Surgery Grows For People In Their Nineties

October 31, 2014 11:04 am | by Larry Husten, Forbes.com | News | Comments

As people continue to live longer physicians are increasingly confronted with very elderly patients who have serious conditions that might benefit from surgery but who are at high risk for surgical complications. Published in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery, doctors at Mayo Clinic reviewed their experience with 59 patients age 90 or older who had severe aortic stenosis and underwent surgical or transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

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Study: Elderly Face No Added Risk From Cosmetic Surgery

October 31, 2014 10:39 am | by Josh Brown, Vanderbilt University | News | Comments

Senior citizens are at no higher risk for complications from cosmetic surgery than younger patients, according to a recent study by plastic surgeons at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. The doctors analyzed data from more than 129,000 patients during a five-year period and found no significant difference in the rate of complications for individuals older or younger than 65 ...

Medicare Bought Meds For Dead People

October 31, 2014 10:11 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

Call it drugs for the departed: Medicare's prescription program kept paying for costly medications even after patients were dead. The problem was traced back to a head-scratching bureaucratic rule that's now getting a second look. A report released Friday from the Health and Human Services Department's inspector general says the Medicare rule allows payment for prescriptions filled up to 32 days after a patient's death ...

ACS Report: Multi-Procedural Technology Drives Innovation and Profitability

October 29, 2014 9:00 am | by Jeff Reinke, Editorial Director | Blogs | Comments

Walking the halls of the American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress & Expo offers a number of opportunities. Embedded within the clamor of the show floor and pictured in part by the varying HD, 4K and 3D displays, are an array of new products promising to push the OR forward ....

First Time at ACS an Eye-Opener

October 28, 2014 10:33 am | by Kevin Damask, Surgical Products | Blogs | Comments

On Monday, I saw many of the products we feature in the magazine and online, up close and personal. It was great to finally see what we've been covering in action and talk to many of the surgeons, product managers and PR representatives who are extremely passionate about their products. I even had the opportunity to test out a couple ...

Study: Millions of Unused Medical Supplies in U.S. Operating Rooms Each Year

October 27, 2014 8:49 pm | News | Comments

A Johns Hopkins research team reports that major hospitals across the U.S. collectively throw away at least $15 million a year in unused operating room surgical supplies that could be salvaged and used to ease critical shortages, improve surgical care and boost public health in developing countries ...

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For Brain Hemorrhage, Risk of Death is Lower at High-Volume Hospitals

October 24, 2014 10:31 am | News | Comments

For patients with a severe type of stroke called subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), treatment at a hospital that treats a high volume of SAH cases is associated with a lower risk of death, reports a study in the November issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health ...

Study: Paperwork Consumes One-Sixth of Physicians' Time, Erodes Morale

October 23, 2014 12:21 pm | News | Comments

The average U.S. doctor spends 16.6 percent of his or her working hours on non-patient-related paperwork, time that might otherwise be spent caring for patients. And the more time doctors spend on such bureaucratic tasks, the unhappier they are about having chosen medicine as a career ...

How People View Their Weight Influences Bariatric Surgery Success

October 23, 2014 11:23 am | News | Comments

Negative feelings about one’s own weight, known as internalized weight bias, influence the success people have after undergoing weight loss surgery, according to research appearing in the journal Obesity Surgery, published by Springer ...

Study: Readmission After Colorectal Cancer Surgery a Quality Measure

October 23, 2014 11:01 am | News | Comments

No significant variation was found in hospital readmission rates after colorectal cancer surgery when the data was adjusted to account for patient characteristics, coexisting illnesses and operation types, which may prompt questions about the use of readmission rates as a measure of hospital quality ...

Zimmer's Samudio: 'Crucial For All Healthcare Workers to Work Together' in Ebola fight

October 20, 2014 11:27 am | News | Comments

In our continuing coverage of how the Ebola virus is affecting medical facilities, Candace L. Samudio, longtime healthcare professional and clinical excellence team leader in the surgical division at Zimmer, provides insight on the importance of surgical helmet systems and stresses the need for ORs and ERs to work together ... 

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Post-Tonsillectomy Complications More Likely in Kids From Lower-Income Families

October 16, 2014 11:20 am | News | Comments

Removing a child's tonsils is one of the most common surgeries performed in the United States, with approximately 500,000 children undergoing the procedure each year. New research finds that children from lower-income families are more likely to have complications following the surgery ...

Patients Seek Help For Eating Disorders Years After Weight Loss Surgery

October 16, 2014 10:33 am | by The New Haven Register | News | Comments

Morbidly obese individuals who had weight loss surgery are seeking treatment for eating disorders years after their procedure, prompting concerns among some experts about the assessment process used to identify surgical candidates. “They are terrified of gaining the weight back,” said Dr. Sara Niego, medical director of the Eating Disorders Program at Hartford Hospital’s Institute of Living ...

Obamacare Website Won’t Reveal Insurance Costs for 2015 Until After Election

October 14, 2014 12:03 pm | by The Washington Times | News | Comments

Those planning to purchase health insurance on the Obamacare exchange will soon find out how much rates have increased — after the Nov. 4 election. Enrollment on the Healthcare.gov website begins Nov. 15, or 11 days after the midterm vote, and critics who worry about rising premium hikes in 2015 say that’s no coincidence. Last year’s inaugural enrollment period on the health-care exchange began Oct. 1 ...

TheraNova Introduces Canary Catheter

October 14, 2014 10:37 am | Product Releases | Comments

TheraNova, LLC, a medical device development company creating practical medical solutions, announces the development of a minimally invasive Canary™ Catheter sepsis detection and treatment technology ...

Study: Significant Increase in Post-Surgical Complications

October 14, 2014 10:14 am | News | Comments

Edwards Lifesciences Corporation the global leader in the science of heart valves and hemodynamic monitoring, announced the publication in Critical Care of an analysis on the clinical and economic impacts of post-surgical complications in patients undergoing major surgery ...

Researchers Look at Impact of Patient-to-Physician Messaging

October 13, 2014 11:21 am | News | Comments

Email has become one of the most widespread forms of communication, with its streamlined interactions benefiting both businesses and individuals. With the advent of secure patient web portals and the faith that online access has the potential to improve care, the medical industry is slowly catching up ... 

Twenty Years of Evidence Backs Bariatric Surgery

October 10, 2014 11:13 am | News | Comments

More than 20 years of evidence suggests that bariatric surgery produces greater weight loss and more type 2 diabetes remissions than nonsurgical treatments for the obese. The results, from a National Institutes of Health symposium held last year, support the idea that weight loss surgeries are effective and safe, at least within the first two to five years after surgery. But more studies of long term effects are needed, the authors say ...

Mild Gallstone Pancreatitis: Admit To Medicine or Surgery?

October 10, 2014 10:54 am | News | Comments

Patients with mild gallstone pancreatitis who were admitted to the surgery service went to the operating room sooner and had shorter hospital stays and lower hospital costs than those admitted to the medicine service, in a new retrospective study ...

Universal Screening For MRSA May Be Too Costly

October 8, 2014 11:49 am | News | Comments

Numerous experts and policy makers have called for hospitals to screen patients for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections and isolate anyone testing positive to prevent the spread of these so-called "Superbugs" in healthcare settings. Several states have enacted laws requiring patients be screened for MRSA upon admission ... 

Robotic Surgery: More Complications, Higher Expense For Some Conditions

October 8, 2014 11:30 am | News | Comments

For benign gynecologic conditions, robot-assisted surgery involves more complications during surgery and may be significantly more expensive than conventional laparoscopic surgery, according to a study by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). The results were published online today in Obstetrics & Gynecology ...

Camera That Takes Shots of Entire Body Could Help Doctors Spot Cancer Early

October 6, 2014 11:57 am | News | Comments

Melanoma is the fifth most common cancer type in the United States, and it's also the deadliest form of skin cancer, causing more than 75 percent of skin-cancer deaths. If caught early enough though, it is almost always curable. Now a camera, capable of taking snapshots of the entire human body and rendering high-resolution images of a patient’s skin may help doctors spot cancer early and save lives ...

BD to Acquire CareFusion for $12.2 Billion

October 6, 2014 10:04 am | News | Comments

BD and CareFusion announced Sunday a definitive agreement under which BD will acquire CareFusion for $58 per share in cash and stock, or a total of $12.2 billion, to create a global leader in medication management and patient safety solutions.  The agreement has been unanimously approved by the boards of both companies. 

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