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The Lead

Intra-Arterial Treatment For Clot Removal Is More Effective At Treating Stroke

December 17, 2014 12:00 pm | News | Comments

Study results released today in The New England Journal of Medicine gave the world of stroke care more evidence that physicians are winning the battle against this debilitating disease, which affects as many as one in six people. ...       

Veteran Finally Gets Simple Surgery After Year-Long Wait

December 17, 2014 10:42 am | by Melissa Blasius, KUSA News | News | Comments

Thomas Amabile had cataract surgery Tuesday after a yearlong ordeal with the Denver VA Hospital...

Operating Tunes: How Music Helps Surgery

December 17, 2014 10:14 am | by Julie Beck, The Atlantic | News | Comments

The third episode of the hospital comedy Scrubs starts with a tense moment in the operating room...

Obama's Care vs. ObamaCare

December 16, 2014 12:25 pm | by Dr. Jane M. Orient | Blogs | Comments

The whole country has heard the saga of the President’s sore throat. Many people who have a...

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Popularity Of Outpatient Surgery Centers Leads To Questions About Safety

December 16, 2014 10:45 am | by Kaiser Health News | News | Comments

Wendy Salo was alarmed when she learned where her doctor had scheduled her gynecologic operation: at an outpatient surgery center. “My first thought was ‘Am I not important enough to go to a real hospital?’ ” recalled Salo, 48, a supermarket department manager who said she felt “very trepidatious” about having her ovaries removed outside a hospital. ...   

Insurers Ease 'Obamacare' Deadline to Pay Premiums

December 16, 2014 10:06 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

Trying to head off a new round of consumer headaches with President Barack Obama's health care law, the insurance industry said Tuesday it will give customers more time to pay their premiums for January. ...        

Survey: Prescription Drug Abuse 'Significant Problem'

December 12, 2014 12:01 pm | News | Comments

A survey of primary care physicians found the vast majority of practicing internists, family physicians and general practitioners consider prescription drug abuse to be a significant problem in their community and most physicians agreed opioids were overused to treat pain, according to a research letter published online by JAMA Internal Medicine. ...   

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Children Without Public Insurance Waited Longer For Tests

December 12, 2014 10:09 am | News | Comments

Children with public insurance waited longer after initial evaluation for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) to undergo polysomnography (PSG, the gold standard diagnostic test) and also waited longer after PSG to have surgery to treat the condition with adenotonsillectomy (AT) compared with children who were privately insured, according to a report published online by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery. ...

Robotic Surgery Leads to Organ Preservation For Kidney Cancer Patients

December 11, 2014 11:39 am | News | Comments

Patients with operable kidney cancers were more likely to have a partial nephrectomy -- the recommended treatment for localized tumors -- when treated in hospitals that were early adopters of robotic surgery, according to a new study. ...       

Study: Patients Given Less Blood During Transfusions Do Well

December 11, 2014 10:52 am | News | Comments

Patients with heart disease who receive transfusions during surgeries do just as well with smaller amounts of blood and face no greater risk of dying from other diseases than patients who received more blood, according to a new Rutgers study. ...     

Pathfinder’s Vision Gives Man New Life After Cancer

December 11, 2014 10:18 am | by Kevin Damask, Surgical Products | Blogs | Comments

I always enjoy hearing the latest in 3-D innovation in the operating room, and last week brought another terrific story. ...                           

Ear Surgery Aims to Improve Self-Esteem in Both Children and Adults

December 10, 2014 11:54 am | News | Comments

Ears that excessively protrude from the head can have a considerable negative impact on one's self-esteem, whether it be a child or an adult. Through otoplasty, prominent ears can be corrected at any age after four – early enough to prevent the psychological effects of bullying. Many adults choose to undergo otoplasty to improve self-confidence and be more satisfied with the appearance of their ears. ...

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Research Shows Promise in Reducing Complications of Gastrointestinal Surgery

December 10, 2014 11:36 am | News | Comments

ACell, Inc. announced recently that a peer-reviewed study, "Esophageal Reinforcement with an Extracellular Scaffold During Total Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer," was published in the October, 2014 issue of Annals of Surgical Oncology, featuring its MatriStem Surgical Matrix PSM device. ...

November/December 2014

December 9, 2014 3:56 pm | by Surgical Products Staff | Digital Editions | Comments

This is the digital version of the November-December 2014 issue of Surgical Products magazine.

Patients With Problems After Surgery Should Go Back to Same Hospital

December 9, 2014 11:11 am | by Reuters | News | Comments

When patients have complications after surgery, it’s best to go back to the hospital where the operation was done, a new study suggests. Patients who go instead to a hospital that didn’t do the original operation have a higher risk of death, the researchers found. ...     

Study: Affordable Care Act Leaves Many Children Without Important Benefits

December 8, 2014 12:12 pm | News | Comments

An article published in the Health Affairs December issue is the first ever comprehensive analysis to investigate the Affordable Care Act's Essential Health Benefit (EHB) as it relates to children. The study found that the EHB has resulted in a state-by-state patchwork of coverage for children and adolescents that has significant exclusions, particularly for children with developmental disabilities and other special health care needs. ...

Hack-A-Thon Attacks Ebola With Robots, Software, Remote Controls

December 8, 2014 11:33 am | by GE Reports.com | News | Comments

Treating an infectious disease like the Ebola virus is fraught with dangers for both victims and their caretakers. Ebola’s fatality rate can reach 70 percent and an errant drop of blood, vomit or other bodily fluid can turn a nurse or a doctor into a patient. That’s why engineers and technologists started looking for ways that would allow hospital staff to limit their exposure to the virus when treating the sick. ...

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Recent Studies Link Metabolic Syndrome to Urinary Problems

December 8, 2014 10:46 am | News | Comments

Metabolic syndrome is linked with an increased frequency and severity of lower urinary tract symptoms, but weight loss surgery may lessen these symptoms. The findings, which come from two studies published in BJU International, indicate that urinary problems may be added to the list of issues that can improve with efforts that address altered metabolism.     

Breast Cancer Screening on 'Threshold of an Incredible Exciting Stage'

December 5, 2014 12:22 pm | by GE Reports.com | News | Comments

Some 40 percent of women in the U.S. have what physicians call “dense breast tissue,” which can mask the visibility of tumors on a traditional mammogram. ...                

3-D Printed Heart Could Reduce Surgeries in Children

December 5, 2014 11:06 am | News | Comments

New 3D printed heart technology could reduce the number of heart surgeries in children with congenital heart disease, according to Dr. Peter Verschueren who spoke on the topic today at EuroEcho-Imaging 2014. ...       

Twenty-Four Indian Patients Blinded After Cataract Surgery

December 5, 2014 10:31 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

Authorities ordered an investigation Friday after at least 24 poor and elderly people went blind following cataract surgeries performed at a free medical camp run by a charity in northern India. ...           

Medication Error Killed Woman Following Surgery

December 5, 2014 10:08 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

An Oregon hospital is acknowledging that it administered the wrong medication to a patient, causing her death. ...                                 

GE Celebrates Past and Future of Medical Imaging at RSNA Show

December 4, 2014 11:42 am | by GE Reports.com | News | Comments

Thomas Edison’s light bulb patent was 16 years old when his colleague and GE co-founder Elihu Thomson modified his electric lamp technology and developed an early X-ray machine that allowed doctors to diagnose bone fractures and locate “foreign objects in the body.” The machine, which Thomson built just one year after Wilhelm Roentgen discovered and tested X-rays on his wife, launched GE into the healthcare business. ...

US Patent Innovations Opens State-of-the-Art Facility

December 4, 2014 11:24 am | News | Comments

US Patent Innovations, LLC (USPI) recently announced the opening of its state-of-the-art research laboratory facility, through its newest affiliate, the Jerome Canady Research Institute for Advanced Biological and Technological Sciences, Benefit LLC (JCRI), an in-house clinical research hub specializing in the fields of Biomedical, Proteomics, Molecular Biology, Regenerative and Translational Biology. ... 

IDT and Ubiquitome Partner to Develop Mobile Ebola Test

December 3, 2014 11:45 am | News | Comments

Integrated DNA Technologies (IDT), and Ubiquitome recently announced a partnership to develop the Ubiquitome Freedom4 Real-Time RT-PCR Ebola Virus Assay for easy use in the field. This rapid test is designed to be run on Ubiquitome’s hand-held, battery powered real-time PCR device, the Freedom4. ... 

Siemens Promotes Future of Industry With Radiology Leadership Institute Donation

December 3, 2014 11:24 am | News | Comments

Siemens Healthcare is pleased to announce its financial contribution to Leading Radiology into the Future, a campaign to fund the Radiology Leadership Institute (RLI). The five-year pledge is part of Siemens’ ongoing efforts to help shape the future of radiology and educate those in the industry who will continue to take the profession to new heights. ...

Milwaukee Hospital Uses 3-D Technology to Navigate Through Delicate Liver Surgery

December 2, 2014 10:00 am | by Mark Johnson of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel | News | Comments

"OK. So, this is our guy," said the surgeon, T. Clark Gamblin. "This is his liver." A precise, three-dimensional image of a human liver floated along the computer screen, rotating slowly. The liver was shaded light blue and a few red blood vessels snaked through it. On the liver's left side was an area shaded brown ...

Researchers Use 3-D Printing to Guide Human Face Transplants

December 1, 2014 11:29 am | News | Comments

Researchers are using computed tomography (CT) and 3-D printing technology to recreate life-size models of patients' heads to assist in face transplantation surgery, according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).... 

Fasting Before Surgery Falling Out of Flavor

November 26, 2014 12:18 pm | by Paul Sisson, San Diego Union-Tribune | News | Comments

Pushed by a new protocol developed in Europe, the midnight fast before surgery is gradually falling out of favor with American doctors and creating a potential sweet spot for one local company. ...       

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