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Cryoablation and Intra-tumoral Injection Offer Promise as Cancer Treatment

February 4, 2015 11:43 am | by Image Guided Cancer Specialists | News | Comments

Research shows that cryoablation can be an effective treatment alternative for multiple cancer types. By itself, the technique can destroy tumors from the inside out. When combined with a pair of recently approved drugs, cryoablation can help stimulate the body's own immune response to seek out and destroy remaining cancer cells and prevent tumor regrowth.

A Closer Look at the Impact of Surgical Smoke

February 4, 2015 11:09 am | by Jeff Reinke, editorial director | Articles | Comments

Recently, Surgical Products reached out to a number of experts in the field for their input on best practices for managing this element of electrosurgery and tips on how to avoid problems that are often overlooked.                              

FDA Clears 3D -Printed Titanium Bone Tether Plate for Bunion Surgery

February 3, 2015 12:34 pm | by MedShape | News | Comments

The Bone Tether Plate features a 3-D printed, medical grade titanium alloy for greater customization. The plate serves as the primary component in the FastForward Bunion Correction System, a new approach to surgically correct hallux valgus deformities.

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10 Guidelines for Googling Patients

February 3, 2015 12:23 pm | by Penn State College of Medicine | News | Comments

With the internet and social media becoming woven into the modern medical practice, Penn State College of Medicine researchers contend that professional medical societies must update or amend their Internet guidelines to address when it is ethical to "Google" a patient.

Exploring 4K Technology in the OR

February 2, 2015 10:09 am | by Jeff Reinke, editorial director | Articles | Comments

The operating room continues to push the limits of procedural innovation and technological capability. Recently, Surgical Products sat down with some industry experts to gauge their input on how many of these new technologies will impact the surgical community, from both an implementation and procurement perspective.

Lean Management Could Improve Healthcare

January 30, 2015 12:30 pm | by Monash University | News | Comments

Waiting times in hospital emergency departments could be cut with the introduction of Lean Management and Six Sigma techniques. Lean Management involves never-ending efforts to eliminate or reduce 'waste' while Six Sigma is a disciplined, data-driven method for eliminating defects.

New Model For Preserving Donor Tissue Will Aid Joint Repair Procedures

January 29, 2015 1:13 pm | by University of Missouri-Columbi | News | Comments

Currently, doctors have to throw away more than 80 percent of donated tissue used for joint replacements because the tissue does not survive long enough to be transplanted. Following a recent study, researchers have developed a new technology that more than doubles the life of the tissue.

Why New OR Visualization Tech is Worth the Cost

January 29, 2015 12:26 pm | by Surgical Products | Articles | Comments

Visualization technology in the OR is ever-changing, with new solutions on tap for 2015 and beyond. Knowing that 3D imaging and 4K visualization is cutting edge might not be enough to justify the purchase, so Surgical Products sat down with some key thought leaders to garner their perspective.

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3D Printing Repairs Tracheal Damage

January 27, 2015 11:00 am | by North Shore-Long Island Jewish (LIJ) Health System; The Society of Thoracic Surgeons | News | Comments

Researchers have been able to combine advancements in tissue engineering and 3D printing to construct new cartilage for airway construction in repairing damaged windpipe and trachea segments. The approach offers greater customization for varying patients, including children. 

CT May Be Overused in the ER

January 27, 2015 10:32 am | by American Roentgen Ray Society | News | Comments

The use of head CT as part of a screening examination, rather than as a diagnostic tool, likely stems from increased pressure on emergency physicians to evaluate and differentiate between benign and life-threatening causes of dizziness and syncope.

Search for Less Invasive Brain Surgery Leads to Eyelid

January 27, 2015 1:07 am | by Lauran Neergaard, AP | News | Comments

The idea: make a small incision right in the crease and sneak past the eyeball into the hard-to-reach center of the head. "The nice thing about it is, we have to saw off much less of your head."                 

How Cancer Turns Good Cells to the Dark Side

January 26, 2015 10:55 am | by Rice University | News | Comments

A new computational study shows how cancer cells take advantage of the system by which cells communicate with their neighbors as they pass messages to "be like me" or "be not like me."                                

How Top Healthcare Priorities Will Impact The OR

January 23, 2015 11:09 am | by Jeff Reinke, editorial director | Blogs | Comments

A recent report from Accenture identified the top five priorities for states with federally-supported Health Innovation Plans. So let's take a look at how these priorities will not only impact the system as a whole, but more specifically, the surgical community.

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Colorectal Cancer Treatment Needs Continue To Grow

January 23, 2015 10:34 am | by GBI Research | News | Comments

While a number of new drug options will be launched in the CRC therapeutics market over the forecast period, none of these drugs will have a dramatic impact on the overall arena.                 

Transoral Fundoplication Proven Effective For GERD

January 22, 2015 1:29 pm | by American Gastroenterological Association | News | Comments

Transoral fundoplication is an effective treatment for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), especially for patients with persistent regurgitation despite proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, according to a new study.          

The Cybernetic Brain and Implant Revolution

January 21, 2015 12:52 pm | by GE Reports | Articles | Comments

Where does the human end and the machine begin? In the era of neuroprosthetics, tiny electronic devices embedded in the body that stimulate the brain and other parts of the nervous system to improve their function, this question may soon get harder to answer.

Non-invasive Monitoring Can Reduce Surgical Costs By One-Third

January 20, 2015 2:39 pm | News | Comments

According to Duke University assistant professor Thomas Hopkins, MD, Director of Quality Improvement at Duke University School of Medicine’s Anesthesiology Department, "Our model shows more than $3 of costs avoided for each $1 spent perioperatively on noninvasive hemodynamic monitoring.

Good Cosmetic Results And Safety With Liposculpture of the Hips

January 16, 2015 11:41 am | News | Comments

Two decades of experience by senior plastic surgeons in different parts of the world show excellent cosmetic results and low complication rates with liposculpture of the hips, flanks, and thighs, reports a paper in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery--Global Open®, the official open-access medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). ...

Stem Cells Show to Regenerate Bone And Cartilage in Adult Mice

January 16, 2015 11:14 am | News | Comments

A stem cell capable of regenerating both bone and cartilage has been identified in bone marrow of mice. The discovery by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) is reported today in the online issue of the journal Cell. ...       

Combat Vets Brains Reveal Hidden Damage From IED Blasts

January 15, 2015 12:12 pm | News | Comments

The brains of some Iraq and Afghanistan combat veterans who survived blasts from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and died later of other causes show a distinctive honeycomb pattern of broken and swollen nerve fibers throughout critical brain regions, including those that control executive function. ...  

Study: Why is Pancreatic Cancer So Aggressive?

January 15, 2015 11:29 am | News | Comments

New research from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center helps explain why pancreatic cancer is so lethal, with fewer than a third of patients surviving even early stage disease. ...            

Patients With Advanced Colon Cancer Having Less Surgery, Better Survival

January 15, 2015 10:33 am | News | Comments

The annual rate of primary tumor removal for advanced stage IV colorectal cancer (CRC) has decreased since 1988 and the trend toward nonsurgical management of the disease noted in 2001 coincides with the availability of newer chemotherapy and biologic treatments, according to a report published online by JAMA Surgery. ...    

Cardiac Specialists Recommend Donor Heart Allocation Changes

January 14, 2015 11:59 am | News | Comments

A group of leading cardiac specialists has proposed new guidelines for the allocation of donor hearts to patients awaiting transplant. The changes are aimed at improving the organ distribution process to increase the survival rate of patients awaiting transplant and posttransplant. ...    

Colorectal Cancer Patients Having Less Surgery, Better Survival

January 14, 2015 11:47 am | News | Comments

The annual rate of primary tumor removal for advanced stage IV colorectal cancer (CRC) has decreased since 1988 and the trend toward nonsurgical management of the disease noted in 2001 coincides with the availability of newer chemotherapy and biologic treatments, according to a report published online by JAMA Surgery. ...   

Can Inhaled Oxygen Cause Cancer?

January 14, 2015 10:50 am | News | Comments

The ancient physician/alchemist, Paracelsus, said: "The dose makes the poison." According to a new study published in PeerJ, even oxygen may fall prey to the above adage. ...               

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