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Transplant Patient Outcomes Strong Following Trauma

June 11, 2013 12:21 pm | News | Comments

Physicians from the Department of Surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have determined that outcomes for traumatic injury in patients with organ transplants are not worse than for non-transplanted patients. One theory indicates that severe trauma activates nearly all components of the immune system, triggering a series of responses that lead to inflammation, which can limit tissue damage and promotes repair.

Nanofiber Sensors Detect Cancer Faster

June 11, 2013 12:10 pm | News | Comments

New research suggests that smartphone users could diagnose serious diseases, such as diabetes or lung cancer, quickly and effectively by simply breathing into a nanofiber breathing sensor mounted on the phones. The use of biomarkers to predict certain diseases such as acetone for diabetes, toluene for lung cancer, and ammonia for kidney malfunction could speed diagnosis and cut costs.

Women Can Be Screened With Virtual Colonoscopy Later Than Men

June 10, 2013 11:57 am | News | Comments

A new study has found that women can be screened for colorectal cancer at least five to 10 years later than men when undergoing an initial "virtual colonoscopy." The findings may help establish guidelines for the use of this screening technique, which is less invasive than a traditional colonoscopy.

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African Plants Could Stop Tumor Growth

June 10, 2013 11:51 am | News | Comments

African medicinal plants contain chemicals that may be able to stop the spread of cancer cells. This is the conclusion of researchers following laboratory experiments. The plant materials will now undergo further analysis in order to evaluate their therapeutic potential.

3-D Map Of Brain Shows Surprises

June 10, 2013 11:37 am | News | Comments

Blood vessels within a sensory area of the mammalian brain loop and connect in unexpected ways, a new map has revealed. The study describes vascular architecture within a well-known region of the cerebral cortex and explores what that structure means for functional imaging of the brain and the onset of a kind of dementia.

Duke Surgeon Conducts First U.S. Human Trial With Engineered Blood Vessel

June 7, 2013 10:27 am | by Kelsey Rupp | News | Comments

A surgeon at Duke University performed the first U.S. implantation of a bioengineered blood vessel on Wednesday, using a new technique that may improve the lives of dialysis patients. A non-living tube built using living cells, a bioengineered blood vessel resembles natural blood vessels in size and strength but is not made of unnatural materials like synthetic blood vessels, called grafts.

Robotic Limbs Moved By The Mind

June 6, 2013 9:37 am | by CBS News | Videos | Comments

Humans can now move robotic limbs using only their thoughts and, in some cases, even get sensory feedback from their robotic hands. Just a few years ago, this would sound impossible. However, now it is a reality. Learn more about this technology through the story of Jan Scheuermann, a Pittsburgh mother of two.

New Technology Makes Breast Cancer Surgery More Precise

June 3, 2013 11:46 am | News | Comments

Surgeons at UC Irvine Medical Center are the first in the country to use a device that reduces by half the need to reoperate and cut out breast cancer cells missed during an initial lumpectomy. The MarginProbe System lets the surgeon immediately assess whether cancer cells remain on the margins of excised tissue. Currently, patients have to wait days for a pathologist to determine this.

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What I Look For In An EMR

June 3, 2013 9:30 am | by Rob Lamberts, M.D | Blogs | Comments

Perhaps the problem is that I still use the term “medical record,” or (worse) “EMR” to describe what I am looking for.  While computers have been an important part in the corruption of the system, they have not been the cause of the screwing up, they have simply made the screwing happen at a much faster rate.

Former Semi-Pro Arena Football Player Bridged To Heart Transplant With Artificial Heart

May 31, 2013 11:03 am | News | Comments

When Justin Ryder, 35, was discharged from University of Arizona Medical Center in Tucson on May 20, he had a new donor heart beating in his chest and a new baby boy waiting for him at home in Las Vegas, his heart transplant made possible by 83 days of life with a temporary total artificial heart.

SDC3 All-In-One Data Management Solution

May 31, 2013 10:39 am | by Stryker Endoscopy | Stryker Endoscopy | Product Releases | Comments

(2013 ESP Award Nominee) Stryker Endoscopy’s SDC3 is an all-in-one data management solution to increase OR workflows and efficiencies.  The SDC3 features device and voice control capabilities, allowing both surgeon and staff to control devices such as the light source, arthroscopy pump, insufflator, camera, capture device, lights, and more from anywhere in the OR.

ScaleOR

May 29, 2013 9:51 am | by NDS Surgical Imaging | NDS Surgical Imaging | Product Releases | Comments

(2013 ESP Award Nominee) NDS Surgical Imaging's ScaleOR is a universal video format scaler and converter, the first of its kind, designed specifically for the healthcare industry. Until now, OR staff had to deal with numerous devices to surmount the challenges presented by the signal complexities of video conversion. With ScaleOR, one single device can now make the bridge between analog and digital, standard definition and high definition.

Doctors And Hospitals’ Use Of Health IT More Than Doubles Since 2012

May 24, 2013 11:32 am | News | Comments

HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius today announced that more than half of all doctors and other eligible providers have received Medicare or Medicaid incentive payments for adopting or meaningfully using electronic health records (EHRs). HHS has met and exceeded its goal for 50 percent of doctor offices and 80 percent of eligible hospitals to have EHRs by the end of 2013.

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Doctors Save Ohio Boy By 'Printing' An Airway Tube

May 24, 2013 9:45 am | by Stephanie Smith | Articles | Comments

Kaiba Gionfriddo had a rare obstruction in his lungs called bronchial malacia. With hopes dimming that he would survive, doctors tried the medical equivalent of a "Hail Mary" pass. Using an experimental technique never before tried on a human, they created a splint made out of biological material that effectively carved a path through Kaiba's blocked airway.

Cutting-Edge Device Helps Hospital Attack Brain Tumors

May 23, 2013 9:24 am | by YouTube | Videos | Comments

Technology at Michigan's Marquette General Hospital is allowing doctors to better attack brain tumors. Last June, the facility became the first hospital in the United States to perform a surgery using the brain path device to remove tumors.

Flesh-Eating Bacteria Victim Gets Bionic Hands

May 22, 2013 7:46 pm | by NBC News | Videos | Comments

Aimee Copeland, a Georgia woman who lost parts of all four of her limbs to a flesh-eating bacteria after a one-in-a-million, devastating zip line accident, was recently fitted with high-tech, $100,000 bionic hands. This is her incredible story... 

Intuitive Robotic Surgery Case Goes To Jury

May 22, 2013 12:58 pm | News | Comments

Lawyers for the estate of Fred Taylor seek $8.45 million in damages based on claims that Intuitive is mostly to blame for his injuries stemming from a 2008 robot-assisted removal of his prostate gland. Taylor and his family allege he suffered because of Intuitive’s inadequate training that was streamlined and compromised by the company’s push to sell its robots.

Using Video Monitoring To Measure Hand-Washing Compliance

May 21, 2013 10:21 am | News | Comments

The North Shore-LIJ Health System is expanding a first-of-its-kind video monitoring system used to measure hand-washing compliance at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, NY, by introducing cameras in operating rooms at Forest Hills (NY) Hospital. The new pilot program strengthens patient safety by providing hospitals with real-time feedback in their operating rooms.

Ten Mistakes Practices Make In Implementing Information Technology

May 21, 2013 10:02 am | by Rosemarie Nelson | Blogs | Comments

Simply acquiring technology is not enough; it is essential to implement the technology effectively to achieve those types of results. Here, then, are the top 10 mistakes practices make in implementing information technology — and how to avoid making them.

After Ravages Of Flesh-Eating Bacteria, Woman Uses New Bionic Hands

May 20, 2013 9:43 am | by Michael Martinez | Articles | Comments

Flesh-eating bacteria amputee Aimee Copeland now uses the latest technology in prosthetic hands to chop vegetables, pick up tiny items like Skittles, and comb and iron press her hair. The "i-limb ultra revolution" hands can cost up to $120,000 each, said a spokesman for manufacturer Touch Bionics.

Pentax Medical And Hitachi-Aloka Medical Continue Joint Innovation And Global Leadership In Endoscopic Ultrasound Systems

May 17, 2013 1:40 pm | News | Comments

PENTAX Medical, a healthcare industry leader in endoscopic imaging, and Hitachi-Aloka Medical, a global leader in ultrasound imaging, recently announced renewed collaborative efforts between the two global companies to enable further innovation in the development of Endoscopic Ultrasound Systems (EUS).

S.A.F.E.

May 17, 2013 10:01 am | by Steris | Product Releases | Comments

Steris offers the new S.A.F.E. Situational Awareness for Everyone Display. It is designed to provide automatic access to key patient information from diverse IT systems – laboratory, radiology, medical records, allergies, and more – within the operating room. It provides a dynamic view of clinical information on a dedicated, easy to read display to optimize clinical decision making and patient safety.

Why It’s Risky To Pay For A Proprietary Health IT System

May 17, 2013 9:13 am | by Edmund Billings, M.D. | Blogs | Comments

While it may seem that the financial problem created by expensive, proprietary health IT is simple and straightforward—health IT expenses push the budget into the red, doctors see fewer patients, revenue falls, and creditors come calling—healthcare economics are unique and apparently beamed from some other dimension where up is down and black is white, so linear explanations don’t really hold.

Let's Move Forward

May 15, 2013 10:13 am | by Mike Schmidt, Editor, Surgical Products | Blogs | Comments

I hope that the FDA’s efforts investigate robotic surgery will not slow or dissuade brilliant individuals and forward-thinking companies from developing more useful solutions for the operating room. I have no desire to see hospitals, surgeons, and OR staff members balk at these solutions in favor of re-embracing traditional or old-fashioned practices and attitudes.

(Some) Medical Professionals Ditch Pen And Paper

May 14, 2013 3:05 pm | by CBS News | Videos | Comments

New healthcare laws are not only urging doctors to keep digital records. They are urging doctors to keep ONLY digital records moving forward. However, it must be noted that only 40 percent of physicians in the United States have converted their paper files.

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