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Laser Surgery Shows Promise Halting Seizures in Epilepsy Sufferers

August 20, 2014 10:52 am | News | Comments

A year ago, Justin Wan often couldn't make it more a week without an epileptic attack and his senses were dulled by heavy doses of anti-seizure medications. But today, the only outward sign that he suffered from debilitating seizures is a small staple scar on the top of his head, hidden by a headful of thick black hair - where surgeons in December inserted a tiny laser that zapped out a lesion in his brain. He hasn't had a seizure since.

North Korean Women Get Cosmetic Surgery to Work Abroad

August 19, 2014 12:34 pm | News | Comments

Cosmetic surgery procedures common in South Korea are becoming increasingly popular in the North, sources inside the country have told DailyNK. Previously, North Koreans were expected to abide by strict codes of conduct on appearance and avoid any trends seen as anti-socialist, but under the young leader Kim Jong-un, these appear to be easing – a move observers say is designed to show his rule as a modern and progressive.

Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair Rivals Surgery

August 19, 2014 12:24 pm | News | Comments

Survival rates with catheter-based mitral valve repair are comparable to classic surgery and better than conservative management in high-surgical-risk patients with severe mitral valve regurgitation, researchers reported. Researchers Martin J. Swaans, MD, of St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, the Netherlands, and colleagues wrote about the study in the journal JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Michigan Girl Mauled by Raccoon Finishes Surgeries

August 19, 2014 11:29 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

Charlotte Ponce, whose face was mauled by a pet raccoon when she was a baby, is celebrating the completion of two years' worth of reconstructive surgical procedures. Since August 2012, she has had her upper lip repaired, her nose rebuilt and been given a new right ear. She underwent skin graft surgery last week on the arm where her ear was harvested.

Pigs' Hearts Transplanted Into Baboons Viable More Than a Year

August 18, 2014 11:38 am | News | Comments

Investigators from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have successfully transplanted hearts from genetically engineered piglets into baboons' abdomens and had the hearts survive for more than one year, twice as long as previously reported. "This has potential for paving the way for the use of animal organs for transplantation into humans," said Dr. Muhammad M. Mohiuddin. 

California Hospital Offers New FDA-Approved Transcatheter Heart Valve Therapy

August 18, 2014 10:53 am | News | Comments

El Camino Hospital became one of the first hospitals in California to adopt a new minimally invasive system to treat patients with narrowed, failing aortic heart valves who are considered to be at high risk to undergo surgery. El Camino Hospital was one of 45 U.S. sites involved in the High Risk Study of the CoreValve U.S. Pivotal Trial, which led to the FDA approval of the CoreValve System.

Surgeon Uses Google Glass to Broadcast Surgery Live

August 15, 2014 11:17 am | News | Comments

In the first case of its kind, a Chinese surgeon used a Google Glass device to broadcast orthopedic surgery live, with the procedure watched by foreign colleagues in Asia and Europe on mobile phones and tablets, reports said Thursday. The surgery was performed by an orthopedic surgeon at a Chinese hospital known for its skills in reattachment of severed limbs — who live-cast the operation with the Google Glass’s 500-megapixel camera.

Stimuli-Responsive Drug Delivery Prevents Transplant Rejection

August 14, 2014 11:52 am | News | Comments

Following a tissue graft transplant—such as that of the face, hand, arm or leg—it is standard for doctors to immediately give transplant recipients immunosuppressant drugs to prevent their body's immune system from rejecting and attacking the new body part. However, there are toxicities associated with delivering these drugs systemically, as well as side effects since suppressing the immune system can make a patient vulnerable to infection.

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Immune Cell Discovery Could Halt Cancer Spread

August 14, 2014 10:49 am | News | Comments

Melbourne researchers have revealed the critical importance of highly specialised immune cells, called natural killer cells, in killing melanoma cells that have spread to the lungs. The team, from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, also found natural killer cells were critical to the body's rejection of donor bone marrow transplants and in the runaway immune response during toxic shock syndrome.

Regional Anesthesia Breakthrough for Pediatric Knee Surgeries

August 13, 2014 12:18 pm | News | Comments

A recent study of an ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia technique, called femoral nerve block, shows that it leads to less opioid use and allows the majority of patients to go home within hours of surgery. "Our goal with this technique is to reduce pain, which improves patient outcomes and patient satisfaction," said Tarun Bhalla, MD, director of Acute Pain and Regional Anesthesia at Nationwide Children's Hospital.

First Time in US: Doctors Replace Valve Outside Heart

August 13, 2014 11:57 am | News | Comments

For the first time in the United States, doctors at Henry Ford Hospital used a minimally invasive procedure to replace a failing, hard-to-reach heart valve with a new one – and placed it just outside the heart. Henry Ford is the first hospital in the United States to perform the unique, transcatheter tricuspid valve replacement, which was pioneered in Germany.

Kentucky surgeon performs unique skull surgery

August 13, 2014 10:59 am | News | Comments

A surgeon at University of Louisville Hospital, part of KentuckyOne Health, recently performed an extended endoscopic skull-based surgery of the brain, a unique surgery of its kind in Kentucky. This approach reduces risks and recovery times for the patient who would otherwise need a craniotomy, which requires temporary removal of a bone flap from the skull to access the brain and brain retraction to reach the tumor.

Glue Produced by Sandcastle Worm Could Prevent Fetal Surgery

August 11, 2014 12:03 pm | News | Comments

In creating an adhesive patterned after glue produced by the lowly underwater sandcastle worm, researchers reported they may have solved the problem of premature births that sometimes result from fetal surgery. It also could open up numerous opportunities to safely perform more complex fetal surgeries in the future.

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Research Shows Promise for New Nerve Repair Technique

August 11, 2014 11:25 am | News | Comments

A multicenter study including University of Kentucky researchers found that a new nerve repair technique yields better results and fewer side effects than other existing techniques. Participants with nerve injuries were randomized into either conduit or allograft repair groups. Following the surgeries, independent blind observers performed standardized assessments at set time points to determine the degree of sensory or motor recovery.

New Study Sheds Light on Emergency Gallbladder Removal

August 11, 2014 11:05 am | News | Comments

A new Mayo Clinic study found that 1 in 5 patients who went to the emergency room with gallbladder pain and were sent home to schedule surgery returned to the ER within 30 days needing emergency gallbladder removal. The surgical complication rate rises with the time lag before surgery, the researchers say.

Stem Cells Show Promise for Stroke in Pilot Study

August 8, 2014 12:11 pm | News | Comments

A stroke therapy using stem cells extracted from patients' bone marrow has shown promising results in the first trial of its kind in humans. Four out of five patients had the most severe type of stroke: only four percent of people who experience this kind of stroke are expected to be alive and independent six months later. In the trial, all four of these patients were alive and three were independent after six months.

Grafted Stem Cells Show Dramatic Growth in Rat Spinal Cord Injuries

August 8, 2014 11:59 am | News | Comments

Scientists report that neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) and grafted into rats after a spinal cord injury produced cells with tens of thousands of axons extending virtually the entire length of the animals' central nervous system. Scientist Paul Lu, PhD, said the axons extended through the white matter of the injury sites, frequently penetrating adjacent gray matter to form synapses with rat neurons.

Study: Cell Regulation Gene Causes Kidney Cancer in Children

August 7, 2014 11:40 am | News | Comments

Mutations in a gene that helps regulate when genes are switched on and off in cells have been found to cause rare cases of Wilms tumor, the most common kidney cancer occurring in children. The researchers studied the genes of 35 families with more than one case of Wilms tumor, recruited to the study through a network of collaborators from across the world.

ConforMIS' Knee Implant Boasts Strong Results in Studies

August 7, 2014 11:23 am | News | Comments

ConforMIS, a medical device company providing the only truly customized total knee implant systems for patients, today announced results from two in vivo clinical studies comparing the motion patterns of patients treated with ConforMIS’ iTotal® versus off-the-shelf knee implants. The studies involved the first-ever use of an advanced real-time mobile x-ray fluoroscopy system designed to measure a wider range of natural movements.

Safety Net Sought in Tumor Growth After Stem Cell Transplantation

August 6, 2014 12:09 pm | News | Comments

Recent studies have shown that transplanting induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells (iPS-NSCs) can promote functional recovery after spinal cord injury in rodents and non-human primates. However, a serious drawback to the transplantation of iPS-NSCs is the potential for tumor growth, or tumorogenesis, post-transplantation.

New Material For Surgical Products Could Aid In Healing Process

July 28, 2014 12:27 pm | News | Comments

A team of researchers have created a biodegradable biomaterial that is inherently antioxidant and can be used to create elastomers, liquids that turn into gels, or solids for building devices or implants that are more compatible with cells and tissues, reducing inflammation or rejection.

New Radiological Indicators For Lap Band Slippage

July 25, 2014 12:41 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have identified two previously undescribed radiological signs of potentially life-threatening slippage of laparoscopically adjustable gastric bands. Adding widespread knowledge of the new signs—inferior displacement of the superolateral band margin by more than 2.4 cm from the diaphragm and the presence of an air-fluid level above the band will aid in diagnosing affected bariatric patients.

Tests Improve Approaches For Thyroid Cancer Surgery

July 25, 2014 12:08 pm | News | Comments

Previously, “if the portion removed during the first surgery came back positive for cancer, a second surgery was needed to remove the rest of the thyroid. The molecular testing panel now bypasses that initial surgery, allowing us to go right to fully removing the cancer with one initial surgery. This reduces risk and stress to the patient, as well as recovery time and costs.”

Surgeons Remove 232 "Tooth-Like Structures" From Teen

July 25, 2014 11:41 am | News | Comments

Surgeon Vandana Thoravade said Ashik Gavai suffered complex odontoma, a rare condition in which a tumor grows under a gum and creates smaller tooth-like growths called denticles. He said the team of dental surgeons took seven hours to remove all the denticles.

After 13-Hour Surgery, Optimism For Rock Attack Victim

July 24, 2014 12:17 pm | News | Comments

Doctors had a simple goal when they first saw how a football-size rock thrown from an interstate overpass had shattered Sharon Budd's skull — keep her alive. Screws, bolts and plates now hold together the face of the seventh-grade teacher from Uniontown, Ohio.

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