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Study: Breast Surgery A Definitive And Safe Treatment For Elderly

September 5, 2014 10:21 am | News | Comments

A study conducted by National Cancer Centre Singapore (NCCS) has shown that age per se is not a contraindication to breast cancer surgery, and such surgeries may be safely performed for women aged 80 years and above. The study explores the safety of breast cancer surgery in women aged 80 years and above.

Reconstructive Surgery: Many Options After Bone Cancer Treatment

September 4, 2014 12:27 pm | News | Comments

Most people having bone cancer might consider having plastic or reconstructive surgery after treatment. This helps in repairing the damage resulting from the cancerous tumor being removed from the cartilage, bone, surrounding soft tissues and ligaments. The process of removing the cancer can result in the patient being scarred and disfigured and plastic or reconstructive surgery could be necessary to repair the damage.

Surgery Could Be Breakthrough For Epilepsy Sufferers

September 4, 2014 11:41 am | by Jocelyn Maminta | News | Comments

There’s a breakthrough in surgery for epilepsy patients, reported wtnh.com Wednesday. And, Yale New Haven Hospital is the only one in the Northeast, offering it. It is the end of a long journey and the beginning of a hopeful one for Chelsea Murallo, living with epilepsy since she was two-years-old. She is in early on this Tuesday, prepping for innovative brain surgery at Yale-New Haven Hospital.

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Oxford Performance Materials Receives FDA Clearance For 3D Printed Facial Device

September 3, 2014 12:01 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Oxford Performance Materials, Inc. (OPM), a leading advanced materials and additive manufacturing (3D printing) company, announced on Aug. 19 that it received 510(k) clearance from the FDA for its 3D printed OsteoFab(R) Patient-Specific Facial Device (OPSFD).

J-Plasma® Wins Innovation of the Year From Surgeons

September 3, 2014 11:01 am | News | Comments

Bovie Medical, a maker of medical devices and supplies and the developer of J-Plasma®, a patented new surgical product, announced that J-Plasma® has been recognized as an Innovation of the Year by The Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons (SLS).

SSIs May Occur Less After Minimally Invasive Surgery

September 2, 2014 12:17 pm | News | Comments

Minimally invasive surgery is associated with fewer surgical-site infections than is open surgery, according to a new observational study of tens of thousands of patients, reported Rueters Health on Tuesday. "Physicians should consider the adoption of minimally invasive approaches in order to reduce the risk of surgical site infections," said lead author Dr. Giorgio Gandaglia.

Cardiac Care: Exciting New Procedures For Babies

September 2, 2014 12:00 pm | by Priscilla Lynch, Irish Times | News | Comments

Heart surgery on babies who are still in the womb, 3D plastic models of actual babies’ hearts that allow surgeons to plan their surgery, and biodegradable heart stents are among the major developments on the way for pediatric cardiology patients. While they might sound like something from a science-fiction movie, all these developments will be discussed during a congenital cardiac study day Thursday in Ireland, reported the Irish Times.

UK Hospitals See Reduced Procedure Times by Implementing 3D Printing Solutions

August 28, 2014 1:19 pm | News | Comments

Stratasys Ltd., a global leader of 3D printing and additive manufacturing solutions announced that UK medical 3D printing specialist, Replica 3DM, is using its Stratasys 3D Printers to support 12 National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in the validation of patient surgery prior to an operation. As a result, this is having a significant impact on the length of surgical procedures leading to substantial reductions in theatre costs.

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3D Printing in Reconstructive Facial Surgery Must Overcome Reimbursement Challenge

August 27, 2014 11:21 am | News | Comments

While three-dimensional (3D) printing has been lauded as a game-changing development in the medical devices industry, the technology is battling to convince surgeons that it is a financially viable treatment for craniomaxillofacial (CMF) reconstruction, says an analyst with research and consulting firm GlobalData.

Unique Surgery Marks A First For Bermuda

August 25, 2014 10:51 am | News | Comments

A surgery performed for the first time here in Bermuda could allow a young man to breathe on his own for the first time since an accident paralyzed him several years ago, potentially allowing him to be cared for at home in the future, reported Bernews.com on Monday. The surgery required a team of surgeons, with the supervising doctor saying, “The operation could not have been done better anywhere else in the world.”

Study: Surgery Equals Better Survival for Patients With Laryngeal Cancer

August 22, 2014 1:54 pm | News | Comments

Patients with advanced laryngeal cancer appear to have better survival if they are treated with surgery than nonsurgical chemoradiation, based on a study by Uchechukwu C. Megwalu, M.D., M.P.H., of the Ichan School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, and colleagues. Approximately 11,000 to 13,000 cases of laryngeal cancer are diagnosed each year and squamous cell carcinoma accounts for the vast majority of these tumors.

Apple’s HealthKit to Revolutionize Mobile Health Market

August 21, 2014 10:36 am | News | Comments

“GlobalData believes that Apple’s strategy to unite medical applications, electronic health records and peripheral devices through a platform, reported to be the HealthKit, will be a major milestone in the wave of technology-healthcare alliances," said Linda Tian, GlobalData's Analyst covering medical devices.

Blocking 'Chili Pepper' Receptor Could Lead to New Pain Medication

August 20, 2014 11:01 am | News | Comments

Biting into a chili pepper causes a burning spiciness that is irresistible to some, but intolerable to others. Scientists exploring the chili pepper's effect are using their findings to develop a new drug candidate for many kinds of pain, which can be caused by inflammation or other problems. They reported their progress on the compound, which is being tested in clinical trials, in ACS' Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

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Laser Surgery Shows Promise Halting Seizures in Epilepsy Sufferers

August 20, 2014 10:52 am | News | Comments

A year ago, Justin Wan often couldn't make it more a week without an epileptic attack and his senses were dulled by heavy doses of anti-seizure medications. But today, the only outward sign that he suffered from debilitating seizures is a small staple scar on the top of his head, hidden by a headful of thick black hair - where surgeons in December inserted a tiny laser that zapped out a lesion in his brain. He hasn't had a seizure since.

North Korean Women Get Cosmetic Surgery to Work Abroad

August 19, 2014 12:34 pm | News | Comments

Cosmetic surgery procedures common in South Korea are becoming increasingly popular in the North, sources inside the country have told DailyNK. Previously, North Koreans were expected to abide by strict codes of conduct on appearance and avoid any trends seen as anti-socialist, but under the young leader Kim Jong-un, these appear to be easing – a move observers say is designed to show his rule as a modern and progressive.

Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair Rivals Surgery

August 19, 2014 12:24 pm | News | Comments

Survival rates with catheter-based mitral valve repair are comparable to classic surgery and better than conservative management in high-surgical-risk patients with severe mitral valve regurgitation, researchers reported. Researchers Martin J. Swaans, MD, of St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, the Netherlands, and colleagues wrote about the study in the journal JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

Michigan Girl Mauled by Raccoon Finishes Surgeries

August 19, 2014 11:29 am | by the Associated Press | News | Comments

Charlotte Ponce, whose face was mauled by a pet raccoon when she was a baby, is celebrating the completion of two years' worth of reconstructive surgical procedures. Since August 2012, she has had her upper lip repaired, her nose rebuilt and been given a new right ear. She underwent skin graft surgery last week on the arm where her ear was harvested.

Pigs' Hearts Transplanted Into Baboons Viable More Than a Year

August 18, 2014 11:38 am | News | Comments

Investigators from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have successfully transplanted hearts from genetically engineered piglets into baboons' abdomens and had the hearts survive for more than one year, twice as long as previously reported. "This has potential for paving the way for the use of animal organs for transplantation into humans," said Dr. Muhammad M. Mohiuddin. 

California Hospital Offers New FDA-Approved Transcatheter Heart Valve Therapy

August 18, 2014 10:53 am | News | Comments

El Camino Hospital became one of the first hospitals in California to adopt a new minimally invasive system to treat patients with narrowed, failing aortic heart valves who are considered to be at high risk to undergo surgery. El Camino Hospital was one of 45 U.S. sites involved in the High Risk Study of the CoreValve U.S. Pivotal Trial, which led to the FDA approval of the CoreValve System.

Surgeon Uses Google Glass to Broadcast Surgery Live

August 15, 2014 11:17 am | News | Comments

In the first case of its kind, a Chinese surgeon used a Google Glass device to broadcast orthopedic surgery live, with the procedure watched by foreign colleagues in Asia and Europe on mobile phones and tablets, reports said Thursday. The surgery was performed by an orthopedic surgeon at a Chinese hospital known for its skills in reattachment of severed limbs — who live-cast the operation with the Google Glass’s 500-megapixel camera.

Stimuli-Responsive Drug Delivery Prevents Transplant Rejection

August 14, 2014 11:52 am | News | Comments

Following a tissue graft transplant—such as that of the face, hand, arm or leg—it is standard for doctors to immediately give transplant recipients immunosuppressant drugs to prevent their body's immune system from rejecting and attacking the new body part. However, there are toxicities associated with delivering these drugs systemically, as well as side effects since suppressing the immune system can make a patient vulnerable to infection.

Immune Cell Discovery Could Halt Cancer Spread

August 14, 2014 10:49 am | News | Comments

Melbourne researchers have revealed the critical importance of highly specialised immune cells, called natural killer cells, in killing melanoma cells that have spread to the lungs. The team, from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, also found natural killer cells were critical to the body's rejection of donor bone marrow transplants and in the runaway immune response during toxic shock syndrome.

Regional Anesthesia Breakthrough for Pediatric Knee Surgeries

August 13, 2014 12:18 pm | News | Comments

A recent study of an ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia technique, called femoral nerve block, shows that it leads to less opioid use and allows the majority of patients to go home within hours of surgery. "Our goal with this technique is to reduce pain, which improves patient outcomes and patient satisfaction," said Tarun Bhalla, MD, director of Acute Pain and Regional Anesthesia at Nationwide Children's Hospital.

First Time in US: Doctors Replace Valve Outside Heart

August 13, 2014 11:57 am | News | Comments

For the first time in the United States, doctors at Henry Ford Hospital used a minimally invasive procedure to replace a failing, hard-to-reach heart valve with a new one – and placed it just outside the heart. Henry Ford is the first hospital in the United States to perform the unique, transcatheter tricuspid valve replacement, which was pioneered in Germany.

Kentucky surgeon performs unique skull surgery

August 13, 2014 10:59 am | News | Comments

A surgeon at University of Louisville Hospital, part of KentuckyOne Health, recently performed an extended endoscopic skull-based surgery of the brain, a unique surgery of its kind in Kentucky. This approach reduces risks and recovery times for the patient who would otherwise need a craniotomy, which requires temporary removal of a bone flap from the skull to access the brain and brain retraction to reach the tumor.

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