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Glue Produced by Sandcastle Worm Could Prevent Fetal Surgery

August 11, 2014 12:03 pm | News | Comments

In creating an adhesive patterned after glue produced by the lowly underwater sandcastle worm, researchers reported they may have solved the problem of premature births that sometimes result from fetal surgery. It also could open up numerous opportunities to safely perform more complex fetal surgeries in the future.

Research Shows Promise for New Nerve Repair Technique

August 11, 2014 11:25 am | News | Comments

A multicenter study including University of Kentucky researchers found that a new nerve repair technique yields better results and fewer side effects than other existing techniques. Participants with nerve injuries were randomized into either conduit or allograft repair groups. Following the surgeries, independent blind observers performed standardized assessments at set time points to determine the degree of sensory or motor recovery.

New Study Sheds Light on Emergency Gallbladder Removal

August 11, 2014 11:05 am | News | Comments

A new Mayo Clinic study found that 1 in 5 patients who went to the emergency room with gallbladder pain and were sent home to schedule surgery returned to the ER within 30 days needing emergency gallbladder removal. The surgical complication rate rises with the time lag before surgery, the researchers say.

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Stem Cells Show Promise for Stroke in Pilot Study

August 8, 2014 12:11 pm | News | Comments

A stroke therapy using stem cells extracted from patients' bone marrow has shown promising results in the first trial of its kind in humans. Four out of five patients had the most severe type of stroke: only four percent of people who experience this kind of stroke are expected to be alive and independent six months later. In the trial, all four of these patients were alive and three were independent after six months.

Grafted Stem Cells Show Dramatic Growth in Rat Spinal Cord Injuries

August 8, 2014 11:59 am | News | Comments

Scientists report that neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) and grafted into rats after a spinal cord injury produced cells with tens of thousands of axons extending virtually the entire length of the animals' central nervous system. Scientist Paul Lu, PhD, said the axons extended through the white matter of the injury sites, frequently penetrating adjacent gray matter to form synapses with rat neurons.

Study: Cell Regulation Gene Causes Kidney Cancer in Children

August 7, 2014 11:40 am | News | Comments

Mutations in a gene that helps regulate when genes are switched on and off in cells have been found to cause rare cases of Wilms tumor, the most common kidney cancer occurring in children. The researchers studied the genes of 35 families with more than one case of Wilms tumor, recruited to the study through a network of collaborators from across the world.

ConforMIS' Knee Implant Boasts Strong Results in Studies

August 7, 2014 11:23 am | News | Comments

ConforMIS, a medical device company providing the only truly customized total knee implant systems for patients, today announced results from two in vivo clinical studies comparing the motion patterns of patients treated with ConforMIS’ iTotal® versus off-the-shelf knee implants. The studies involved the first-ever use of an advanced real-time mobile x-ray fluoroscopy system designed to measure a wider range of natural movements.

Safety Net Sought in Tumor Growth After Stem Cell Transplantation

August 6, 2014 12:09 pm | News | Comments

Recent studies have shown that transplanting induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells (iPS-NSCs) can promote functional recovery after spinal cord injury in rodents and non-human primates. However, a serious drawback to the transplantation of iPS-NSCs is the potential for tumor growth, or tumorogenesis, post-transplantation.

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New Material For Surgical Products Could Aid In Healing Process

July 28, 2014 12:27 pm | News | Comments

A team of researchers have created a biodegradable biomaterial that is inherently antioxidant and can be used to create elastomers, liquids that turn into gels, or solids for building devices or implants that are more compatible with cells and tissues, reducing inflammation or rejection.

New Radiological Indicators For Lap Band Slippage

July 25, 2014 12:41 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have identified two previously undescribed radiological signs of potentially life-threatening slippage of laparoscopically adjustable gastric bands. Adding widespread knowledge of the new signs—inferior displacement of the superolateral band margin by more than 2.4 cm from the diaphragm and the presence of an air-fluid level above the band will aid in diagnosing affected bariatric patients.

Tests Improve Approaches For Thyroid Cancer Surgery

July 25, 2014 12:08 pm | News | Comments

Previously, “if the portion removed during the first surgery came back positive for cancer, a second surgery was needed to remove the rest of the thyroid. The molecular testing panel now bypasses that initial surgery, allowing us to go right to fully removing the cancer with one initial surgery. This reduces risk and stress to the patient, as well as recovery time and costs.”

Surgeons Remove 232 "Tooth-Like Structures" From Teen

July 25, 2014 11:41 am | News | Comments

Surgeon Vandana Thoravade said Ashik Gavai suffered complex odontoma, a rare condition in which a tumor grows under a gum and creates smaller tooth-like growths called denticles. He said the team of dental surgeons took seven hours to remove all the denticles.

After 13-Hour Surgery, Optimism For Rock Attack Victim

July 24, 2014 12:17 pm | News | Comments

Doctors had a simple goal when they first saw how a football-size rock thrown from an interstate overpass had shattered Sharon Budd's skull — keep her alive. Screws, bolts and plates now hold together the face of the seventh-grade teacher from Uniontown, Ohio.

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ERAS Program Validated For Colorectal Surgery Patients

July 24, 2014 12:08 pm | by Cristina B. Geltzeiler, M.D., of Oregon Health and Science University, and Colleagues | News | Comments

The fundamental aspects of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programs are guidelines that focus on education, fluid management, minimal incision length, decreased use of tubes and drains, opioid-sparing analgesia, early mobilization and eating after surgery.

Fitbit In Healthcare: Is More Data Better?

July 23, 2014 10:34 am | by Kevin R. Campbell, MD | Blogs | Comments

For scientists and researchers who are developing new treatments for disease, data is power. For patients, data can mean empowerment. Devices that track health indicators are readily available and in use to track heart rate, blood pressure, blood sugar and even respiratory rate and body temperature ...           

Study Confirms Value In RF GERD Treatment

July 22, 2014 11:59 am | News | Comments

A newly published peer-reviewed paper states that Stretta therapy is a safe and effective treatment option for gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD). The paper states that Stretta addresses a significant unmet need where patients receive inadequate control from PPI therapy, or find surgery an undesirable option.

Robotic, Computer-Assisted Devices Struggling To Win Over Orthopedic Surgeons

July 22, 2014 11:52 am | News | Comments

The cost-effectiveness of robotic devices for high-volume surgeries, such as large joint reconstruction and spinal fusion, hasn't been justified yet. Furthermore, GlobalData says that the current economic climate and reimbursement hindrance for computer-assisted joint replacements have resulted in many hospitals feeling reluctant to embrace these modern technologies.

Radiofrequency Ablation Treatment Eases Spinal Pain

July 22, 2014 11:03 am | News | Comments

"... extreme back pain due to spinal tumors degrades quality of life, and until now, limited minimally invasive procedural options ... have been available,” said Nam D. Tran, M.D., and Ph.D., neuro-oncology surgeon. “This multi-center study validates t-RFA as a treatment option that provides rapid, lasting pain relief without the need to interrupt the patient’s primary cancer therapy.”

Google Glass Tested In ERs and ORs

July 21, 2014 10:06 am | by USA Today | Videos | Comments

Google Glass is being tested for use in the emergency room and during surgeries...                                                

Scientists Successfully Generate Human Platelets

July 21, 2014 9:14 am | by Brigham and Women's Hospital | News | Comments

Scientists at Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed a scalable, next-generation platelet bioreactor to generate fully functional human platelets in vitro. The work is a major biomedical advancement that will help address blood transfusion needs worldwide...

Teen Part Of Revolutionary New Brain Surgery

July 16, 2014 10:36 am | by WPBF ABC News | Videos | Comments

There's a revolutionary new procedure and approach to brain surgery that only one hundred doctors in the United States have been trained to perform...                             

Nanoparticle Could Improve MRI Scanning For Cancer Diagnosis

July 16, 2014 9:52 am | by Imperial College London | News | Comments

Scientists have designed a new self-assembling nanoparticle, which boosts the effectiveness of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanning for diagnostics by specifically seeking out receptors that are found in cancerous cells...      

Multidisciplinary Approach To Engineered Tissue Commercialization

July 15, 2014 11:41 am | by Mikhaila Friske, Editorial Intern, Surgical Products | Articles | Comments

Industrial engineers at North Carolina State Industrial and Systems Engineering (NC State ISE) are collaborating with biologists and medical doctors for an uncommon approach to regenerative medical research...           

New Flying Eyes Glasses By Summer Hawk Optics, Inc.

July 14, 2014 10:41 am | by Summer Hawk Optics, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Summer Hawk Optics, Inc had surgeons in mind when creating their new version of their Flying Eyes glasses.

Surgery In Space: I Foresee Problems

July 14, 2014 10:27 am | by Skeptical Scalpel | Blogs | Comments

According to NASA, a miniature robot capable of assisting in surgery has been developed, tested in pigs and is soon to be trialed in a weightless environment. The robot, which weighs less than 1 pound, can be inserted into the abdomen via the umbilicus and controlled remotely...

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